The Women's Building was erected as a German American social hall in 1910.  In 1978 a group of radical women, the San Francisco Women's Centers, bought the property, which describes itself as   
  
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  “the only woman-owned, woman-operated facility of its kind in the United States.” A collective of women artists painted the ambitious mural  Maestrapeace  on the building's exterior in 1994. Photo: Paul Krueger Flickr
 Graves' nomination for National Register listing for The Women's Building argues that it is   
  
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  nationally significant as an emblem of intersectional feminism and as a location where the struggle for women’s rights was linked to additional community struggles, including those of marginalized racial/ethnic communities, LGBTQ people, immigrants, and others.  Photo: Oakland Museum of California
 San Francisco's Japanese YWCA at 1830 Sutter Street was designed by famed architect Julia Morgan and completed in 1932. After all people of Japanese descent were imprisoned during WWII, the building was leased to the American Friends Service Committee who organized many programs on civil rights and social justice here.  Photo: Stacy Farr
 Activists protesting SF YWCA's announced sale of Japanese YWCA, 1997. A successful legal action proved that Japantown residents had raised funds to erect the building, and allowed it to remain in community hands as the Nihonmachi Little Friends pre-school.
   
  
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  The Harada family fought a heroic legal struggle to remain in the home they purchased at 3356 Lemon Street in Riverside, challenging California's discriminatory "Alien Land Law," which prohibited Asian immigrants from owning property.  Their successful battle to gain these civil rights was the subject of great attention at the time and the house became a National Historic Landmark in 1990.    Photo: City of Riverside
 Inspired by the Harada House's significance, the City of Riverside engaged Graves and Professor Catherine Gudis from UC Riverside to conduct additional research, including a city-wide survey, a historic context report, and community walking tours, on the broader history of Japanese Americans in Riverside. Photo: Donna Graves 
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